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Christianity

A response to Richard Dawkins

I found this to be very interesting.  Dennis Prager via :

This past Friday CNN conducted an interview with Richard Dawkins, the British biologist most widely known for his polemics against religion and on behalf of atheism.

Asked “whether an absence of religion would leave us without a moral compass,” Dawkins responded: “The very idea that we get a moral compass from religion is horrible.”

This is the crux of the issue for Dawkins and other anti-religion activists — that not only do we not need religion or God for morality, but we would have a considerably more moral world without them.

This argument is so wrong — both rationally and empirically – that its appeal can only be explained by a) a desire to believe it and b) an ignorance of history.

First, the rational argument.

If there is no God, the labels “good” and “evil” are merely opinions. They are substitutes for “I like it” and “I don’t like it.” They are not objective realities.

Every atheist philosopher I have debated has acknowledged this. For example, at Oxford University I debated Professor Jonathan Glover, the British philosopher and ethicist, who said: “Dennis started by saying that I hadn’t denied his central contention that if there isn’t a God, there is only subjective morality. And that’s absolutely true.”

Board votes unanimously to allow student-led prayer

Seen at :

The federal government removed prayer from schools more than 50 years ago, but it will go on in Liberal, led by students and allowed by the school board. Taking action on an item spontaneously added to the agenda near the end of Monday’s meeting, the USD No. 480 school board voted unanimously to allow student-led prayer at all activities in the district.

Because it specifies that school officials do not initiate or lead the prayers, the action is intended to comply with federal law even as it makes prayer possible.

“I think that’s one of the greatest things we’ve ever done,” said board member Tammy Sutherland-Abbott, who seconded board member Nick Hatcher’s motion.

Hatcher introduced the idea during his portion of the time allowed for board comments.

“I would like to see us bring prayer back to the games,” he told his fellow board members, after expressing admiration for the LHS Redskins football team. “I have struggled with that — not having prayer at our activities — because it’s ‘not the thing to do,’ but if the board thought it was important enough that they would support it, and defend it if the time came, I’d like to ask that we do that at our next meeting.”

“Why not do it now?” asked Sutherland-Abbott.

Thousands around the world pray for imprisoned Boise pastor

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For your sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.” No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.  Romans 8:35-37

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Hundreds in Idaho, and likely thousands more around the world, gathered Thursday to hold a vigil for Saeed Abedini. In Boise, Saeed's wife, Naghmeh, led the vigil with the help of the family’s pastor from Calvary Chapel in Boise.

Thursday marked the one year anniversary of Saeed Abedini's imprisonment in Iran. He is being held in Iran on what the Iranian government says is a threat to national security. Naghmeh says he's imprisoned for being a Christian.

Since then Saeed’s imprisonment Naghmeh has fought and pleaded with some of the highest government officials in the world asking for her husband's freedom. Earlier this week she was at the United Nations vying for her husband’s freedom.

With no more legal appeals possible, Naghmeh and her Christian brothers and sisters gathered to appeal to a higher power.

"We just pray for him every day," said Maxene Bruek.

Bruek and her husband Harley go to the same church as the Abedinis, but have never met Saeed.

Sentenced to death for a sip of water

After a hot day of picking berries in the fields, all she wanted was a cool drink of water.  Now she is facing death by hanging.  Read the whole store at ">nypost.com:

I’ve been locked up, handcuffed and chained, banished from the world and waiting to die. I don’t know how long I’ve got left to live. Every time my cell door opens my heart beats faster. My life is in God’s hands and I don’t know what’s going to happen to me. It’s a brutal, cruel existence. But I am innocent. I’m guilty only of being presumed guilty. I’m starting to wonder whether being a Christian in Pakistan today is not just a failing, or a mark against you, but actually a crime.

But though I’m kept in a tiny, windowless cell, I want my voice and my anger to be heard. I want the whole world to know that I’m going to be hanged for helping my neighbor. I’m guilty of having shown someone sympathy. What did I do wrong? I drank water from a well belonging to Muslim women, using “their” cup, in the burning heat of the midday sun.

I, Asia Bibi, have been sentenced to death because I was thirsty. I’m a prisoner because I used the same cup as those Muslim women, because water served by a Christian woman was regarded as unclean by my stupid fellow fruit-pickers.

That day, June 14, 2009, is imprinted on my memory. I can still see every detail.

Christian Relieved of Duties Over Beliefs About Homosexuality


https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_MDkBxO7l4A

Sourced from :

A Christian legal organization has filed an equal opportunity military complaint after a Christian Air Force veteran was relieved of his duties and reassigned to another facility for disagreeing with his commander on the issue of homosexual “marriage.”

, Senior Master Sergeant Phillip Monk has served in the Air Force for 19 years, and has been stationed at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. When he recently returned from deployment, he found that he had a new commander, Major Elisa Valenzuela, who is a lesbian.

Monk says that in his early communication with the commander, he knew there would be concerns.

“She said she wanted a chaplain but objected to one particular chaplain that she called a ‘bigot’ because he preached that homosexuality is a sin,” he explained to reporters. “She then said, ‘I don’t know what kind of people actually believe that kind of cr**.’ I knew I was going to have a rough time in this unit and I would have to be very careful about what I said.”

Duck Dynasty: We’re Using Hollywood to Spread Christian Values

Love this show.  Keep it up, boys!  Sourced from :

Alan is the eldest son of Robertson family patriarch and Duck Commander company founder Phil Robertson.

When he announced he was stepping down from his pastorship, , “What I do for our church–you see, it’s a pretty good-sized church–impacts a lot of people, but because of my association with the show, I’ll get to minister to a lot more people. Any person that’s an evangelist, that’s what you want to do, so I had to give this up for something possibly bigger.”

This month he’s taking that farther saying that he and his family are actually using Hollywood for a purpose for which it is not used to being used.

Mom Banned From Praying on Public School Property

I'm of the mind that the school had no right to ban her.  She didn't work for the school, wasn't obstructing anyone, and regardless of what the FFRF say, it is not unconstitutional.  Giving the impression that the school supports a particular message is a far cry from actually officially supporting it.  Banning someone because they might offend someone's delicate sensibilities is wrong.

The school administration are chickens, and took the easy way out bowing to pressure than stand up for what is right.  Suppressing the freedom of speech and expression is absolutely unconstitutional, while protecting someone from what they may perceive as the school sanctioning a religion is quite a stretch.

Sourced from :

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by Dr. Radut