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Pelosi: "Who is the t-- penalty on?"

Whoopsie, couldn't quite reel in her toungue fast enough to keep from almost calling it a tax.


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German official: Obama should get his own debt under control before handing out free advice

Europe is in financial turmoil, but that doesn't stop a German official from on the President to get his own house in order before offering advice on fixing theirs.

In a not-so-subtle rebuke of President Obama’s tendency to on how Europeans should handle their debt crises on Sunday evening, Germany’s finance minister suggested that perhaps His Munificence should focus on his own problems before trying to fix everybody else’s.

Wolfgang Schaeuble told public broadcaster ZDF in an interview late Sunday that “people are always very quick at giving others advice.”

He says: “Mr. Obama should first of all take care of reducing the American deficit, which is higher than in the eurozone.”

An unfortunate and embarrassing truth — the EU’s debt-to-GDP ratio is well over eighty percent, but the United States’ ratio sits at above one hundred percent.  The difference is that more people still have more confidence in the United States’ financial future, and we have more time to sort things out, but how long can those advantages last before our unsustainable spending habits catch up with us?

Obamacare upheld by SCOTUS, moves from Commerce to Taxing and Spending Clause

There are a ton of stories out there on the ruling.  Judge Roberts was the , sliding his bench a little to the left.  My own opinion is that it was upheld not because it was legal, but because it would be a catastrophe to try to undo at this point.

Since it would not have been Constitutional under the Commerce Clause, it now falls under Congress' power to tax.  When passed, it was denounced as a huge new tax, but that is exactly what it has been confirmed to be.  And that is .  However, non-compliance with the mandate cannot be enforced under tax code, so if you don't feel like paying there won't be jail time, nor liens, nor seizures of property.  I'm pretty sure tax-evaders face all of those things so is this really a tax or was it just cleverly moved under the clause to avoid overturning it?

Bill Whittle discusses the difference between a right and a commodity, and what it means when the latter becomes the former:

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Anti-fraud project spends $102 million to recover $19 million? Something seems amiss

I think they are doing it wrong.   has the deets.:

In a shameful—and costly—example of government incompetence, a special program created to combat Medicaid fraud has cost American taxpayers more than five times the amount of overpayments it has identified.

That means the anti-fraud project, known as National Medicaid Audit Program, has cost the U.S. government $102 million to operate since 2008 while identifying only $19.4 million in overpayments. It seems like a bad joke, but unfortunately it’s not. Instead it’s one of many examples of government inefficiency that ends up sticking it to the people.  

The idea behind the National Medicaid Audit Program was a good one. It was launched to tackle a monstrous epidemic of fraud and overbilling in the joint federal-state healthcare program for the poor. Medicaid has the second-highest (Medicare, the government’s health insurance program for the elderly is first) estimated improper payments of any federal program. In fact, the feds say that $21.9 billion of Medicaid’s federal expenditures of $270 billion in fiscal year 2011 involved improper payments.

Take a peek behind the curtain of the United Nations

Trailer for Ami Horowitz's flick, "."  How much cash do we shovel into this again?  Oh, right,  per year.

In a film that exposes the incompetence and corruption at the heart of the United Nations, filmmaker Ami Horowitz takes us on a harrowing, yet often hilarious, trip through the farcical world of the United Nations.

Horowitz exposes how an organization created to ennoble mankind actually enables chaos and global discord. As disturbing as the picture painted by U.N. Me may be, Horowitz manages to keep us laughing throughout the film. And just when you’re left shaking your head at one outrage or another exposed in U.N. Me, Horowitz reliably enters with comic relief.

Oh, the irony: Government $15.6T in debt runs 16 different programs teaching Financial Literacy

A case of the blind leading the blind?  Perhaps instead of reducing the number of programs from 56 to 16, they should have kept going.  Read the whole story at .

A federal government that is $15.6 trillion in debt is currently using its “bully pulpit” to run 16 different programs to teach citizens “financial literacy,” according to the Government Accountability Office, the accounting agency of the U.S. Congress.

Previously, relying on a study by the RAND Corporation, the GAO had reported that the federal government operated 56 programs to teach citizens “financial literacy.” However, it subsequently determined that 16 was a better count of what it called the government’s “significant financial literacy programs.”

Even among these 16 federal programs that teach citizens “financial literacy,” the GAO found that there is some duplication of efforts and no definitive way to measure the programs’ effectiveness.

The GAO said it held a forum last year where people concluded that the federal government enjoyed a unique “bully pulpit” from which it could preach to citizens about handling their money.

Bank of America tells McMillan Firearms that they no longer want their money

After 12 years in a good business relationship, BofA tells Kelly McMillan of McMillan Firearms Manufacturing that because they have become more of a gun company from the original accessories company, they should bank elsewhere.  Of course BofA is denying it.  Funny how bad press can quickly change things.


(http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wslpVZJCUWQ)

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by Dr. Radut