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Obama administration goes on healthcare defense while House looks to nix funding

Manuvering from both sides continues on the healthcare front. reports that a Democrat advisor who was convicted in a political scandal as a legislative aide will be tapped for leading the initiative to defend the overhaul.

Despite her shady past, the consultant () was hired by Obama to head his 2008 presidential campaign in Wisconsin. Now she’ll join forces with another one of the president’s top campaign strategists (Paul Tewes) to fend off Republican criticism of Obamacare through the 2012 elections.

Although the president has filled many sound bites chastising special-interest money in politics, funding for the new group is being kept . It’s fair to assume however, that the payroll will be quite exorbitant considering the players involved in the new Obamacare defense initiative are high-profile Democratic “political consultants” who command big bucks for their work.

Organizers assure they’ll operate independently of the White House and Democrats in Congress, though they acknowledge that they will  This may be difficult to swallow considering the cause and who’s running the momentous new enterprise, which is expected to be headquartered a stone’s throw from the Oval Office.

The healthcare law defense initiative will be largely headed by Tewes, a key figure in Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign and the man credited with his shocking Iowa Caucus victory. In fact, Tewes is touted by his Washington D.C. consulting firm () as the guy who launched “Obama’s historic campaign” by building the “largest grassroots organization in caucus history.”

On the other side, has the following article about House efforts to introduce an amendment that would strip funding of the very same.

"I expect to see one way or other the product coming out of the House to speak to that and to preclude any funding to be used for that," Cantor said at a news conference, referring to an effort to block implementation of the health-care law.

House Republicans aim to pass a spending measure next week that would immediately cut at least $32 billion from the government's $3.7 trillion budget in an effort to trim budget deficits that could hit an estimated $1.5 trillion this year.

Details of the Republican spending-cut package will be made public on Thursday ahead of a wide-ranging debate on the House floor next week.

Cantor's office said the language blocking funding for the healthcare law is expected to be offered as an amendment during the House debate next week. Republicans, trying to make good on a campaign pledge for a more open legislative process, plan to debate a number of amendments to the spending bill.

Ready... FIGHT!



story | by Dr. Radut