Skip to Content

The U.S. Supreme Court Is Marching in Lockstep with the Police State

Worth reading it all. Summary is below. :

A review of the Supreme Court’s rulings over the past 10 years, including some critical ones this term, reveals a startling and steady trend towards pro-police state rulings by an institution concerned more with establishing order and protecting government agents than with upholding the rights enshrined in the Constitution.

Police officers can use lethal force in car chases without fear of lawsuits. 

Police officers can stop cars based only on “anonymous” tips.

Secret Service agents are not accountable for their actions, as long as they’re done in the name of security.

Citizens only have a right to remain silent if they assert it.

Police have free reign to use drug-sniffing dogs as “search warrants on leashes,” justifying any and all police searches of vehicles stopped on the roadside.

Police can forcibly take your DNA, whether or not you’ve been convicted of a crime.

Police can stop, search, question and profile citizens and non-citizens alike.

Police can subject Americans to virtual strip searches, no matter the “offense.”

Immunity protections for Secret Service agents trump the free speech rights of Americans.

Police can break into homes without a warrant, even if it’s the wrong home.

Police can interrogate minors without their parents present.

It’s a crime to not identify yourself when a policeman asks your name.

Legally owning a firearm is enough to justify a no-knock raid by police.

The military can arrest and detain American citizens.

Students can be subjected to random lockdowns and mass searches at school.

Police officers who don’t know their actions violate the law aren’t guilty of breaking the law.

When all is said and done, what these assorted court rulings add up to is a disconcerting government mindset that interprets the Constitution one way for the elite—government entities, the police, corporations and the wealthy—and uses a second measure altogether for the underclasses—that is, you and me.



deliciousness
story | by Dr. Radut